Thursday, May 25, 2017 - 00:00 • Kyla Mandel
Theresa May

From a Middle Eastern oil magnate to Heathrow and Gatwick, the three main parties have seen a mix of donations come in since Brexit last summer.

The Conservative Party has received significantly more money from individuals and companies in the fossil fuel industry compared to the Labour Party and the Lib Dems, according to the latest data on the electoral register analysed by DeSmog UK.

This news comes after the Conservatives’ election manifesto pledges a unique commitment to increase support for the oil and gas industry should they win in June.

Monday, May 15, 2017 - 06:07 • Mat Hope
Barclays building

Campaigners are celebrating Barclays’ announcement that it will sell its stake in fracking company Third Energy “in due course”. But the company said its overall stance on fracking has not changed.

Until recently, a Barclays subsidiary owned 97 percent stake of the small Yorkshire company, which has a license to frack just south of the North York Moors national park. Its stake is currently about 78 percent, according to a report by consultancy Profundo.

At the bank’s annual general meeting last week, its chairman John McFarlane confirmed Barclays' plans to ultimately sell the subsidiary that owns the Third Energy stake. Environmental campaign group People and Planet said this would be a “huge victory”.

Thursday, May 11, 2017 - 01:02 • Mat Hope
Jeremy Corbyn

Update 17/05/2017: The full manifesto has now been published, and the key climate and energy promises are in line with the leaked version.

The UK is failing to tackle climate change and needs a Labour government to put the country “back on track”, according to a leaked version of the party’s 2017 general election manifesto.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 05:32 • Guest
power cables

The UK and EU will have much to discuss when it comes to country's future participation in the regional energy market. Strong cooperation makes sense for both sides, argues Antony Froggatt, senior research fellow for Chatham House, and co-author of a new report on energy policy after Brexit.

The UK’s decision to leave the European Union (EU) after 43 years of membership will fundamentally reshape the UK’s relations with the EU27, and negotiations are likely to be lengthy and complex. However, energy policy is one area where it may be politically easier to find common ground. 

Given the amount of existing energy trade between the UK and the EU, particularly for electricity, and further plans for decarbonisation and more interconnection across the European continent, it would be unrealistic to remove the UK completely from the EU energy market. If successful, a strong UK-EU27 energy cooperation could pave the way for a new partnership model for the EU, the UK and their neighbours.

Wednesday, May 10, 2017 - 02:01 • Guest
Emmanuel Macron

France's newly elected president, Emmanuel Macron, promised to be a climate leader during his campaign. To fulfil that pledge, he must use his new status to persuade the United States to stay in the Paris Agreement, Andy Rowell writes for Oil Change International.

Donald Trump was quick to take to Twitter to congratulate the centrist candidate Emmanuel Macron on his resounding victory against the far-right, Marine Le Pen, in the French presidential race.

On Monday, Trump said: “Congratulations to Emmanuel Macron on his big win today as the next President of France. I look very much forward to working with him!”

As usual with Trump, the tweet is a U-turn from his previous position which was qualified support for the far-right Le Pen. There is no doubt that Trump wanted Le Pen to win.

Monday, May 8, 2017 - 00:00 • Kyla Mandel
Drax coal power

The UK has given an average €434.5 million (£368 million) in subsidies to the coal industry each year between 2005 and 2016 new research by the Overseas Development Institute (ODI) has found.

The new report published today by ODI shows that European countries are continuing to support coal despite pledges to phase out the polluting fossil fuel by 2020 (or 2025 in the case of the UK and Ireland).

According to the report, Europe’s 10 largest carbon emitters – responsible for 84 percent of the continent’s emissions – have given €6.3 billion (£5.33 billion) in subsidies to coal each year over the past decade.

Thursday, May 4, 2017 - 00:00 • Kyla Mandel
Myron Ebell

The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) was in touch with climate science denier Myron Ebell during his time as head of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) transition team, DeSmog UK can confirm.

According to a Freedom of Information Request, the FCO corresponded with Ebell in his role under President Trump prior to Ebell's visit to London in January.

However, the content of their discussions remains unknown. The FCO Climate Diplomacy Team refused to release any details after several requests for clarification and further information about their discussions.

Monday, May 1, 2017 - 13:00 • Kyla Mandel
Windmills and smoke stacks

The Brexit climate science deniers have over the weekend launched a coordinated attempt to persuade the UK to cut green regulations ahead of Theresa May revealing the Conservative Party’s 2017 general election manifesto.

In op-ed columns and letters to the editor in both The Times and The Telegraph members of climate science denying and neoliberal think tanks have criticised the UK Climate Change Act for increasing energy prices and called for looser regulations once we leave the European Union.

Those authoring the columns and heading up the letters belong to a small yet influential group of hardline Euro-climate sceptics as revealed by DeSmog UK last summer.

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